Course description and goals:

Students will read, discuss, and analyze excerpts of works from such authors as Kleist, Büchner, Hauptmann, Schnitzler, Lasker-Schüler, Frisch, and Brecht within their historical contexts. Discussion will focus on dramatic theory and the tragi-comic nature of human existence as portrayed in these works.

The course is structured around readings and interactive classroom discussions supplemented by presentations on key elements introduced in the readings or important historical and cultural events. There will also be periodic student-led presentations. Class participation is essential and integral to the nature of this course. Approximately 5-10 minutes per class will be dedicated to discussing and practicing writing skills.

Taught in German. Prerequisites: GR 260 or higher. Alternatively, students may take the departmental placement exam or obtain the instructor’s permission prior to enrollment.

H, I; CS, CW; 3.00 credits

 

Course objectives:

By the end of the semester, students should be able to:

·       Identify a number of seminal German plays and playwrights of the 19th and 20th centuries

·       Discuss the historical and cultural context of at least two plays in depth

·       Articulate how Brechtian dramatic theory broke from Aristotelian, specifically the relationship of epic theater to the tragi-comic nature of human existence as portrayed in the works read


Course description and goals:

This course introduces students to the literary and cultural developments in the German-speaking countries from the end of World War II until the fall of the Berlin Wall. Texts by authors such as Bachmann, Böll, Dürrenmatt, and Grass will serve as the foundation for our discussion of the question of Vergangenheitsbewältigung, the politically involved literature of the 1960s, the “New Subjectivism” of the 1970s, and literary postmodernism of the 1980s.

The course is structured around readings and interactive classroom discussions supplemented by presentations on key elements introduced in the readings or important historical and cultural events. There will also be periodic student-led presentations. Class participation is essential and integral to the nature of this course. Students will also engage in a variety of writing tasks to further develop their written communication skills and to chart their learning progress.

Taught in German. Prerequisites: GR 230, GR 232, or GR 235. Alternatively, students may take the departmental placement exam or obtain the instructor’s permission prior to enrollment.

H, I; CS; 3.00 credits


Introductory German I is a beginning course, which introduces students to the basics of the German language. Students will practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing in German to conduct basic communication in everyday situations and to develop an understanding of contemporary German culture. Active participation and self-expression will be particularly emphasized to enable students to develop their oral proficiency and to communicate in German from an early stage. Upon completion of this course, successful participants will be able to carry out simple conversations and conduct a number of routine transactions in the target language.

Three weekly class meetings with the instructor will cover the fundamentals of communicating in German at the beginner level. We will also explore German culture and life in Germany through topics such as family and friends, food and shopping, housing, daily routines, hobbies, etc.

Mandatory weekly sessions with a TA will give students an opportunity to further practice the skills they have acquired during class meetings.

The class is taught in German. No prerequisites. Students receive H or I credit provided that they have not taken more than two years of German at the secondary level.

H, I; 4.00 credits