Course description:

Introductory German II is the continuation of Introductory German I (GR 110). This course is designed for students with one semester of college-level German or the equivalent. Students are introduced to the basics of the German language: Participants will practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing in German to conduct basic communication in everyday situations and to further their understanding of contemporary German culture. Active participation and self-expression will be particularly emphasized to enable students to further develop their oral proficiency and to communicate in German from an early stage.

Three weekly class meetings will cover the fundamentals of German grammar and pronunciation, expand students’ existing vocabulary, and explore the culture of Germany and German-speaking countries. Topics will include travel in German-speaking countries; Switzerland; leisure-time activities; and housing in Germany.

Weekly sessions with a TA will give students an opportunity to further practice the skills they have acquired during class meetings.

The class is taught in German. Prerequisites: GR 110. Alternatively, students may take the departmental online placement exam or obtain the instructor’s permission prior to enrollment.

H, I; CS; 4.00 credits

 

Learning objectives:

  • Upon successful completion, students will be able to participate in simple conversations about familiar subjects and conduct simple transactions  using basic vocabulary and structures
  • Write short, simple texts about themselves and familiar topics
  • Understand spoken and written expressions and simple sentences pertaining to themselves and everyday life


Course description and goals:

GR-299: ST: Texts in Context. This course is designed for students with four semesters of college-level German or the equivalent. Participants will further develop their linguistic fluency and expand their understanding of contemporary German culture by engaging with a variety of cultural artifacts that may include newspaper and magazine articles, short stories, novels, cartoons, video clips, feature films, song lyrics, etc. Themes addressed in the course may include some of the following: youth culture, issues of national and individual identity, environmental issues, language use in different social settings, sports and entertainment, the role of Germany in Europe, etc.
Two weekly class meetings will review the fundamentals of German grammar, expand students' existing vocabulary, and explore the culture of Germany. 
The class is taught in German. Prerequisites: GR 232. Alternatively, students may take the departmental online placement exam or obtain the program director's permission prior to enrollment.
 
Learning objectives:
Building on the linguistic proficiency previously acquired, this course focuses on expanding vocabulary, exploring communicative strategies, and increasing oral proficiency via active participation and self-expression. During the course of the semester, students will become acquainted with and practice various writing styles ranging from the descriptive to the critical and argumentative.

Course description:

A historical overview and critical analysis of the impact of selected, eminent German women on the world, with an emphasis on German culture and society. The course analyzes how their contributions and actions have shaped the cultural, political, scientific, and social discourse, structures, and institutions in Germany from the Middle Ages to the present. Taught in English. Prerequisite: EN-109 or EN-110. 3.0 credits. CA; H, I

Objectives:

Students will demonstrate knowledge of the role of German women in the shaping of German culture and society from the Middle Ages to the present. This includes being able to

 

  • Identify a number of historical and contemporary German women who significantly contributed to areas as diverse as the arts, natural and social sciences, philosophy, women’s rights, public discourse, and the political landscape of contemporary Europe.
  • Discuss how their actions and contributions have influenced and continue to influence German society and the world.